The Victorians loved Ghost Photography. It helped that in the early days of Photography exposures were long and images were often slightly unsharp. Any movement during a long exposure would create a ghosting effect and the first Ghost pictures were probably accidents.

Today this technique is still the easiest way to make a ghost.  

TECHNIQUE 

Select a slow shutter - of up to 10 seconds if it's dark enough. The "Ghost" is carefully positioned - depending on what he or she is wearing - against a light or dark part of the scene. The ghost stands very still for 1/4 - 1/2 of the exposure time (experiment to see which is best ) and then moves quickly out of the frame. 

Use Manual or Shutter Priority Mode to set the slow shutter with a very small aperture of 16 or 22.

So with an exposure of 6 seconds the subject must stay still for 2 or 3 seconds and then leave the frame. It's always different depending on the location and background and you can make a successful image with much shorter exposure times - but obviously it's more difficult to calculate fractions of a second than whole seconds.

The second way to create a ghost in camera is to use Flash - but once again making sure that the exposure is less than half of the overall exposure for the scene. This will give a clearer image of the Ghost but it will still be see-through.

The final way to make a ghost is to use Photoshop in post Production. Decide on your picture and take one version with the ghost and one without. Then blend the two images and lower the opacity on the shot with the ghost. 


Dressing Up   

Decide if you want a modern or old - fashioned ghost. The choice of clothing and the pose the ghost adopts is really important.


HAVE FUN  

Titarenko's ghosts are symbols of the tyranny of Communism 

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Without flash

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Using flash

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Photoshop double image 

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Photoshop

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Using Format